I’m Andie Katschthaler

I’m a storyteller

Follow the story

Meet Andie

Language is my play-doh.
Emotions are what I build with it.

I’m not a one-trick pony. Instead of following a trodden career path I have gathered experience in many different fields. Thus I bring a very diverse set of skills to the table – a skillset that you get to make use of when you hire me. I have worked in journalism and PR, can draw from experiences in filmmaking, and I really am the fount of creativity that artists often are. I’m conveniently gifted with words and capable of thinking in images and moving pictures.

So whether you’re an advertising agency, a film studio, a publication or Google Creative Lab (especially if you’re Google Creative Lab) – you will benefit from my capability to create with a 360° view of things.

Watch my first short film now!

Snapped
written & directed by Andie Katschthaler
featuring Ramona Mühlthaler as Ella and Susie Ramberger as Natascha
Runtime: 9:29 min

If you’ve enjoyed my film please consider donating to support my work.





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What I do

r

writer

I am comfortable with a variety of styles from screen writing to film reviews to bare-it-all blogging.

A

director

I love directing, working with dedicated actors and crew to help a story come alive on the screen.

N

floor manager

In my work as a floor manager I enjoy the adrenaline and high pressure that comes with the job.

Y

copywriter

I am looking to work in advertising because I believe storytelling is important for brands too.

Portfolio

'Inselglück'

'Inselglück'



travel column
Snapped

Snapped



short film
film reviews

film reviews



select articles
The Dancer

The Dancer



photo series
Ether Magazine

Ether Magazine



select articles
eSports brochure

eSports brochure



raising awareness
Der Standard

Der Standard



select articles
Gamers.AT

Gamers.AT



feature article
Kurier

Kurier



select articles
press releases

press releases



select work
press kits

press kits



select work
Wiener Journal

Wiener Journal



feature story
Wiener Zeitung

Wiener Zeitung



select articles

Blog

Art has Worth

After much debating with myself and the people closest to me I’ve made the decision to include a donate button on my website. The idea behind it is that if you have enjoyed my work you would consider paying for it – just like you would for your burger or your hairspray.

This is a big step for me because it has taken me a long time to figure out that what I do is more than just a fancy.

Art has Worth. With a capital ‘W’.
My art has Worth.

Putting up your stuff for open donations means people can consume it for free if they choose to do so. This could be construed as, ‘My art isn’t worth anything’, but what it really means is, ‘My art can speak for itself and I trust that people will appreciate it enough to honour my work’. And that is a huge leap of faith that requires some guts.

I think we live in a wonderful time. The internet has given artists the power to cut out the middlemen. This makes us quintessentially free from being forced into the confines of what business moguls think entertainment should look like. It enables us to make art for art’s sake.

Self-publishing has started properly taking off with musicians, with brave people like Amanda Palmer paving the way (thank you, Amanda). It’s finally spreading to other artforms as well but I feel like film is trailing a bit behind so far. Of course this is making me a little uneasy.

However, today I am taking the plunge.
I encourage you to watch my film Snapped and let me know what you think of it, because at the end oft he day getting my stories seen and heard is still the most important thing.

But I am also asking you to respect my art’s worth and hit that donate button located underneath the video*.

Thank you,
Andie

*and in the sidebar of the blog

Critiquing the creative

I asked someone to critique my first short film, Snapped. And this person took valuable time out of their day to watch it, think about it, and write back to me about it pretty extensively. This is a gift, and I know it.

However, criticism – real, constructive criticism as opposed to praise/dissing – is a gift that likes to hide a little behind some barbed wire. You have to get past the sting to unearth its real value. Of course it hurts! Probably not because you love your own work so much that you can’t take someone not liking something about it. In fact, people like that, those artists who unambiguously love their own work, are usually the ones to dismiss criticism easily. No, the feedback is probably so hard to digest because you already find your work pretty flawed anyhow and have spent copious amounts of time trying to convince yourself that it’s okay-ish, and suddenly here is someone else pointing those flaws out. It’s terrifying, being “found out” like that. But once you get past wanting the earth to swallow you including your feelings of shame then you can finally start using the criticism for something positive.

That might mean going back and chipping away at your work of art, trying to improve it until it resembles a Giacometti sculpture. Or you might want to leave the incriminating piece behind and apply your newfound wisdom to your next project. What you must not do – and really, I’m giving this advice to myself most of all –; you must not give up. And that’s what I find most difficult about constructive criticism. It is to walk the line between being humble enough to accept it and learn from it and being self-assured enough to not throw in the towel. Don’t be too arrogant to use the feedback nor too lacking in confidence to keep going. This is hard and comes with a lot of second guessing, but it’s not a moment; it’s a process. Some things that are helping me with this process are the following:

1. Whenever I confront myself (or am confronted) with this empowering speech by Ira Glass, it moves me almost to tears. Because it leaves me with a deep feeling of being understood.

Ira Glass, The Taste Gap

It takes away some of the worry, though now of course I sometimes worry about whether I do actually have good enough taste. Because being worry-free would obviously be boring. You can also listen to Ira Glass himself in this lovely short film.

2. Yesterday I showed Amanda Palmer’s wonderful commencement speech The Fraud Police to a friend. That speech is so good, I’m actually considering listening to it in my sleep in hope that it gets through as subliminal messaging. I could totally alternate it with the Ira Glass one.
In a wonderful move that friend made me laugh this morning by emailing me an article from the-toast.net. It is, oddly, a new article and thus quite wonderfully timed: Everyone Has Imposter Syndrome Except For You.

3. Chuck Wendig, who’s blog is a regular ass-kicker for me even when I don’t read every blog post religiously, recently posted a piece by fellow writer Kameron Hurley about what could lead to success as a writer. It’s a very good read but if you don’t have time for it, the tl;dr version is contained in this quote: ”I’d soon realize persistence wasn’t an end game. It was the name of the road.

So now I am going to take the critique that I received, I am going to catch that ball, which is covered in barbed-wire, instead of dropping it because it stings a little. I will sit down and get back to work, bleeding hands or not.

Hidden behind the umbrella

Umbrella, photo by Finn Porter, copyright 2013-11-03 www.tinyowlproductions.com

Finn Porter took this picture during my endeavour today. Still cryptic, but it’s a beautiful photograph.

Today I did something. Something that – to me – was extraordinary and awesome. I won’t tell you what it was just yet, but I will show you all of it when it is done. I really don’t mean to be cryptic, rather I just wanted to get this out there today when it is still raw and very much at the front of my consciousness. And to send a mental thank you note to three people.

Thank you to the two people, who as of last night were complete strangers to me, who dared to challenge me and push me and who showed up to witness my ‘jump’. And thank you as well to the one person who has been there to catch me for more than 8 years and hopefully will keep on doing so for a very long time, supporting me in all my endeavours. My heart is overflowing with gratefulness and love.

Thank you, you know who you are.

Contact

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